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김흥구 · Kim Hungku

Kim Hungku

Kim Hungku(1978~) searches for the memory of an individual being that lies in a specific incident of modern history. He watches and records how the memories are turned into tales and passed down; the memory of an individual on life and death, the memory of a community originated from an individual’s time, and the memory that could not been recorded. By overlapping and repeating each memories of life and death, he focuses on questioning the overall structure and the meaning of tragedy. After studying Documentary Photography in Kyungil University Department of Photography and Imaing, he had solo exhibition and published photo collection with photo series <Jomnye(meaning women divers)>(2003~2013). He was selected as 8th KT&G SKOPF Artist of the year, and won Grand Prize at the ‘GEO’ Olympus Photography Award. Traveling between Jeju Island and the land, he is currently working on <Teumeong(meaning crack)>(2013~) to document Jeju 4.3 uprising.

Guryong Village

Seoul, Korea, 2005

Korean government decided to demolish the slums scattered throughout the city center right before hosting 1988 Seoul Olympics because they seemed to disturb city’s aesthetics. When the ousted poor people gathered together on the outskirt of the city, government connived and built huge fence around that so that their shacks could be unseen. 570 Gaepo-dong, Gangnam, Seoul, became a ghost village that does not exist in the map. This is how the largest unlicensed village of Korea, Guryong Vilage, was built. Most of the villagers in Guryong Village are destined to have poor living condition where water, electricity, and toilets are not properly equipped. Because they are an unlicensed houses, many of them could not be registered as residents. Home is no longer a place where people gather under a roof sharing dreams. It became a dream. It became the goal of life. Today, people still live.

Mullae-dong

Seoul, Korea, 2009

Mullae-dong, was called Saok-dong(meaning the office district) in the Japanese colonial era because large textile factory was located here. The name changed after 8.15 liberation emphasizing that this was the place where Mun Ikjeon first introduced cotton. In the 1980s, Mullae-dong was a district of ironmasters and popular shopping street for iron goods. But the popularity couldn’t last. Even those strong and firm ironworks could not endure the rapid flow of urbanization, but melt away one by one like a used up iron. The industry declined and the ironmasters either closed their shops or disperse into suburbs. Number of vacancy in the street was increasing. In that vacant stores, artists found their ways in. Although it was once in charge of a national industry, the steel alley was barely surviving. However, by fusing with art, the alley found its old vitality again. Ironwork district by day, and artists’ playground at night. The gentrification is present here as well.

OTHER GALLERIES

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Kang Jeauk

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Kim Hungku

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Sung Namhun

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Shin Byoungmoon

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Lee Sangyoup

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Ore Huiying

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Jes Aznar

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Hkun Lat